Sonderausstellung „Handwerken. Vom Wissen zum Werk“

Sonderausstellung „Handwerken. Vom Wissen zum Werk“



How do people learn a craft and how is manual knowledge passed on? The special exhibition illustrates the diversity of craftsmanship.

Whether home improvement, professional craftsmen or amateur hobbyists: crafts, repair and Do-It-Yourself are in vogue. Your own hands are the most important tool. The new special exhibition "Handwerken. From Knowledge to the Work "in the open-air museum on the Kiekeberg shows until February 2, 2020, how and why people in different areas of life lend a hand: How do people learn a craft? How is manual knowledge passed on? And what happens next when craft know-how becomes a rare commodity?

Crafting as a concrete activity is a fundamental human impulse. In the special exhibition, visitors will learn how the cooperation of the head and the hand works. Klaus-Wilfried Kienert, chairman of the foundation of the open-air museum, is pleased: "The new exhibition illustrates the historical development of handicraft and gives visitors an incentive to become active and to do their own work." Museum director Stefan Zimmermann emphasizes the great relevance of the subject: "One Our most important task as an open-air museum is to preserve and communicate old craft techniques. The exhibition sheds light on crafts as the cultural basis of our society, between current trends such as upcycling and do-it-yourself and blatant skills shortages. "

The visitors get to know the variety of crafts: in addition to the classic artisan professions Schmied and Zimmermann, hairdressers, confectioners and gilders are also part of the craft trades. The exhibition shows how the expertise has changed and adapted with the new technologies and innovations. Dr. Bernd Althusmann, Minister of Economics, Labor, Transport and Digitization of Lower Saxony and Deputy Prime Minister, takes a look into the future: "Crafts stand between tradition and innovation and are constantly reinventing themselves. With the exhibition, the open-air museum illustrates the close connection between tradition and knowledge transfer on the one hand and the path to modernity on the other. "Various historical and new tools and equipment such as a World War II cutlery case and a new 3D printer illustrate the development of craftsmanship after the industrialization.

Handicrafts also play an important role in the private sector: "The need to learn to do something on one's own is still present in many people, even after mechanization in the 19th and 20th centuries," explains Alexander Eggert, curator and head of the Department of Folklore of the open-air museum. "40 percent of Germans make something at home themselves. The focus of the exhibition is on the interplay between appropriation, application and transfer of craft knowledge and the diverse motivations behind craft-based DIY. "The special exhibition was created in collaboration with the exhibition association" Work and Life ".

All statements without guarantee.

All statements without guarantee.